Introducing the Global Health and Rights Project and Senior Fellow Alicia Yamin

Despite leaps in biomedical innovation in the developed world, inequalities in global health outcomes persist, as well as systemic barriers to public health and health services. However, the struggle for health rights and global health justice continues.

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy is therefore thrilled to announce the launch of the Global Health and Rights Project (GHRP), which will promote theorization of a “right to health” under international law as well as applicable domestic law, challenges to using human rights frameworks to advance global health justice, the relationship between global economic and health governance, and more. Read More

Telemedicine. Image of a patient speaking to a doctor on a mobile phone.

Telemedicine Adds a Wrinkle to Latest New Mexico Legislative Debate on Aid in Dying

Then-Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist was roundly criticized in 2005 for declaring that Terri Schiavo, a Florida woman who had gone into cardiac arrest at age 26, was “not somebody in persistent vegetative state” after viewing videotapes of her condition. The tragic situation is mostly remembered as a low point for federalism and end of life policy.

But there is another issue stemming from the debate that ought to be considered. Although Frist backed away from calling his review of videos an actual diagnosis, it is interesting to think how the use of technology to make a remote determination of a patient’s condition has changed since Frist made his assessment.

Indeed, over a decade later, a New Mexico bill is proposing the opposite: allowing individuals with a terminal illness to utilize telemedicine consultations to seek aid to end their lives. It is not surprising that New Mexico lawmakers would consider telemedicine as part of their proposal. Given its geography, the state has embraced telemedicine as a means of expanding access, and innovative workforce initiatives such as Project ECHO were birthed there.

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Ethical Concerns of DNA Databases used for Crime Control

By Aziza Ahmed

Genetic databases for crime control have become a national topic for debate after the arrest of the Golden State Killer, also known by his real name, Joseph James DeAngelo.

At the time of his arrest, DeAngelo was 72 years old and had committed more than 50 rapes and 12 murders. While his arrest was celebrated as a law enforcement victory, a host of questions emerged because of the way law enforcement officials eventually found DeAngelo: through a combination of traditional detective work and utilization of data from a crowd-sourced genetic database. In this case, police searched GED-Match, a website created by the Mormon church where users can share genealogical information and find “familial” DNA matches

The Golden State Killer case reignited numerous debates on the issue of DNA searches and the use of DNA evidence, but with a twist. The big question is, should investigators utilize genetic databases, whether run by the government or by private agencies and individuals, to identify the families of suspects, if doing so will lead them to the culprit?

Though the opportunities for crime-solving by utilizing DNA database searches may be vast, new technologies and innovative uses of them do not occur in a vacuum. Instead, novel uses of technology demand consideration of a vast number of ethical issues, and mandate careful interrogation of the potential impact of DNA databases on crime control. Read More

A protester holds a sign with a quote that reads: "Pf all the forms of inequality injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane."

We Shouldn’t Be Focusing on Whether Healthcare Is a Right

The call for “Medicare for All” has grown louder and its cadence more frequent. Even President Obama has expressed support for it. Increasingly, as policymakers and stakeholders debate the path forward for healthcare in the U.S., a familiar invocation of human rights language can be heard.

The sentiment that “healthcare is a right” — rather, that it should be a right — has many layers. Its complexity is more accurately captured as “health(care) is a (human) right”. These parens make my head spin, too. They also suggest that Medicare for All is at best a piecemeal solution to the causes of poor health in the U.S. Read More

Reality star Kim Kardashian at the CFDA Awards at the Brooklyn Museum on June 4, 2018.

Can Kim Kardashian Help Bioethics? Celebrity Data Breaches and Software for Moral Reflection

In 2013, Kim Kardashian entered Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

During her hospitalization, unauthorized hospital personnel accessed Kardashian’s medical record more than fourteen times. Secret “leaks” of celebrities’ medical information had, unfortunately, become de rigueur. Similar problems befell Prince, Farah Fawcett, and perhaps most notably, Michael Jackson, whose death stoked a swelling media frenzy around his health. While these breaches may seem minor, patient privacy is ethically important, even for the likes of the Kardashians.

Since 2013, however, a strange thing has happened.

Across hospitals both in the U.S. and beyond, snooping staff now encounter something curious. Through software, staff must now “Break the Glass” (BTG) to access the records of patients that are outside their circle of care, and so physicians unassociated with Kim Kardashian’s care of must BTG to access her files.

As part of the BTG process, users are prompted to provide a reason why they want to access a file. Read More