Abortion Is Way More Common Than Most Voters Think

By Gregory M. Lipper

A new Vox survey reveals that a majority of registered voters underestimate the rate of abortion, and that the abortion rate is most likely to be understimated by men, college graduates, and those with higher salaries:

More educated and higher-income Americans are especially likely to believe that abortion is rare.

For example, 54 percent of Americans without a college degree underestimate abortion rates, compared with 70 percent of those with graduate degrees. And 51 percent of those earning less than $50,000 underestimate the frequency of abortion, compared with 69 percent of those earning more than $175,000.

The split happens when you look at gender, too. Women would near certainly have more experience with abortion than men. Our poll shows that 67 percent of men underestimate the frequency of abortion, compared with 57 percent of women.

Fortunately for those who support abortion rights, no Supreme Court Justices are wealthy, well-educated men…

Greg Lipper (@theglipper) is Senior Litigation Counsel at Americans United for Separation of Church and State.

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

This week we interviewed Nicole B. Porter at the University of Toledo College of Law. Nicole has served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Toledo. Her research interests focus on the employment rights of women and individuals with disabilities. She teaches Employment Discrimination, Disability Law, Criminal Law, Contracts, and Feminist Legal Theory.
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Nicole’s expertise on the Americans with Disabilities Act is nonpareil, and she discussed several dimensions of ADA practice and advocacy. Nicole’s recent scholarship in the area includes Special Treatment Stigma After the ADA Amendments ActThe Difficulty Accommodating Healthcare Workers, Withdrawn Accommodations, and The New ADA BacklashThe show includes both background on the ADA’s purpose and initial reception, as well as up-to-date analysis of its present application.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Should healthcare systems implement routine recontacting services in clinical practice? Some legal and logistical considerations

By Daniele Carrieri, Angus Clarke, Anneke Lucassen, Susan Kelly

Advances in genetic and genomic medicine are resulting in better diagnosis and treatment of some health conditions, and the question of whether former patients should be recontacted is therefore timely. Recontacting patients to inform them of new information or new testing, that could be relevant to their health or that of their biological relatives is made more pressing by the increasing use of whole genome approaches in healthcare, where variants previously of unknown significance (VUSs) may now have known disease effects.  However, there is currently no consensus about whether or not healthcare professionals have a duty or responsibility to recontact former patients in light of this new information. There is also very little empirical evidence in this area. In a recent article published in Genetics in Medicine, we present the results of a survey of recontacting practices of clinical genetics services across the United Kingdom (UK). As far as we know, this is the first study that specifically explores current recontacting practices in clinical genetic services.

One of the questions of the survey asked was whether clinical genetics services should implement routine recontacting systems. The majority of genetic services were undecided for several reasons.  The main arguments given in favor of implementing such systems revolved around patient choice and the idea of keeping patients up to date.  The main arguments against pointed to the logistical difficulties of implementing recontacting systems and the possible legal implications of doing so, if that were seen as establishing a new standard of care without the additional resources required for this to be a sustainable activity. Read More

NHPC 2016: Growing National Debt Requires Strategic Changes in Health Care Spending

By Cornelia Hall, Master of Public Policy Candidate, Harvard Kennedy School, Class of 2017

This is the third entry in a three-part series on the AcademyHealth National Health Policy Conference, held in Washington, DC, on February 1-2.  Read the first entry here and the second entry here.

The national debt as a percentage of GDP has spiked in the last several years, rising from approximately 35% in 2007 to nearly 74% in 2015.  Federal budget projections suggest that this trend will continue, with the debt nearly exceeding the size of the economy by 2040.  Discussion about these predictions frequently returns to the topic of health care.  Indeed, as the “baby boomer” generation retires and enrolls in Medicare, federal health care spending is expected to rise dramatically.  In an NHPC plenary session, federal budget experts explored this topic and discussed possible methods of controlling the growth of health care spending in years to come. Read More