A white hospital hallway

The Latest in the Continuing Cycle of NHS Patient Safety Inquiries

There does not seem to be a week that goes by without an NHS (National Health Service) patient safety crisis hitting the headlines and this has been the case for many years. Major public inquiry reports into patient safety and health quality failings are published. Recommendations are made, and then another crisis event follows soon afterwards spawning yet other reports, broadly saying the same thing.

The NHS has built up a huge back catalogue of inquiry reports into patient safety crisis’s, spanning decades containing a lot of deep thinking, useful analysis and valuable recommendations. Analysing present and past patient safety crisis inquiry reports is a very useful educational exercise and can help inform future policy development in the area. Some of the seemingly intractable, stubbornly persistent patient safety problems that beset the NHS, both past and present are identified and discussed. Revisiting reports and analysis can also refresh our perspective on patient safety issues and provides an information bedrock on which we can base change.

Patient safety inquiry reports also provide a momentum for change through their recommendations which the government of the day can accept or reject. Read More

NHS logo on the side of a building

Testing the Temperature of Patient Safety in the NHS

In terms of transparency and accountability the National Health Service ( NHS) in England is excellent at producing insightful, well-produced reports on health quality and patient safety. It does this on a regular basis and one of the great difficulties faced by NHS nurses and doctors today is the sheer volume of reports published. It’s an impossible task for nurses and doctors to keep up to date with all the reports published and to maintain heavy workloads in resource constrained environments. It’s also hard for health care staff to know which reports to prioritize and which are authoritative.

There is an urgent need for the NHS to create a one stop, patient safety information hub which collects reports from all NHS sites and other important global sites, putting everything into one accessible place. Some recent reports on written patient complaints have been published which are helpful in assessing, testing patient safety and health quality in the NHS. Read More

A group of surgeons perform an operation in a hospital operating theatre.

Keeping up to Date with Global Patient Safety

One of the great difficulties in patient safety and health quality is keeping up to date with all the material that is produced. A myriad number of patient safety and health resources exist globally. By sharing good quality resources, we can help advance the global patient safety agenda.

NHS Resolution (the operating name of the National Health Service Litigation Authority) has excellent patient safety and clinical negligence resources, learning materials and should be viewed as a priority global information source.

NHS Resolution is a Special Health Authority and is a not-for-profit arm’s length body of the Department of Health and Social Care.It is a part of the NHS and has several functions including handling negligence claims on behalf of NHS organizations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England who are members of the NHS Resolution indemnity schemes. Read More

Patient Safety: The Urgent Need for Global Information Sharing and Learning

Patient harm is the 14th leading contributor to the global disease burden, according to a new report by WHO, OECD, and the World Bank.

In resource-constrained health care environments, it is important not to reinvent the wheel and waste money when existing, proven patient safety solutions already exist in other countries. Global patient safety knowledge sharing, and learning helps all countries, regardless of income level and this needs to be encouraged. Read More

Suicide Prevention and Patient Safety

Suicide prevention needs to be taken more seriously globally by governments, health systems as an urgent public health concern.

WHO (World Health Organisation) states that close to 800,000 people die due to suicide every year, which translates to one person dying every 40 seconds. For each adult who died by suicide there may have been more than 20 others attempting suicide. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15 to 29-year-olds globally, and occurs throughout the lifespan. Read More

Learning from Patient Deaths in the NHS

The independent regulator of health and social care in England, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has just published a report on how the National Health Service (NHS) is progressing in the first year of implementing national guidance on learning from deaths.

The report follows on from another published in 2016 which detailed major failings and concerns about the way the NHS investigate and learn from the deaths of patients in their care. The 2019 report contains several case studies which detail experiences of implementing the national guidance. Read More

An Urgent Need to Improve Mental Health Care in the National Health Service

Mental Health Care in the National Health Service in England has always existed in the shadow of physical care in terms of funding and NHS-government health policy priorities.

Many in the past have termed it the “Cinderella” part of the NHS. This neglect has been chronicled in numerous reports over the years pointing to many problems which include chronic under funding, poor patient safety, abuses of patient rights, poor complaint handling, unnecessary restrictive care regimes, poor patient, health carer communication, and poor patient satisfaction. Read More

UCL A&E entrance

The NHS Complaints System: Wither the Toxic Cocktail Image?

The National Health Service in England has been trying for many years to get its complaints system right, but it has never succeeded. A great number of reports have been published on the system over the years, some dating back for at least a quarter of a century.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC ) the independent regulator of health and social care in England have just published a report launching a “Declare Your Care” campaign, which raises several important issues about the NHS complaints system. Read More

NHS logo on the side of a building

Update on the Future Direction of Patient Safety in the National Health Service

Matt Hancock, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on February 6 gave a wide-ranging speech on the future direction of patient safety in the NHS. The speech is important as it gives key insights into government priorities for patient safety policy development in the NHS.He stated that we all trust nurses and doctors more than any other profession. He spoke about the importance of a “just culture” in the NHS and openness, honesty, and trustworthiness. Read More