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Rachel Rebouché and Scott Burris on “The Week in Health Law” Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

Two great guests this week, Rachel Rebouché and Scott Burris, both from Temple Law School in Philadelphia. We’re here not only to tease Temple Law’s 2019 Law Review Symposium: Looking Back and Looking Ahead, 10 Years of Public Health Law Research, Friday, September 13, 2019, but also to discuss some cutting edge issues in public health responses to the opioids overdose crisis and the erosion of reproductive rights. Scott, of course, is a Professor of Law at the law school, where he directs the Center for Public Health Law Research. He is also a Professor in Temple’s School of Public Health.  Rachel is a Professor of Law at Temple and also serves as Associate Dean for Research. She teaches Family Law, Health Care Law, and Contracts and is currently a co-investigator on two grant-funded research projects related to reproductive health.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in health law and policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts or Google Play, listen at Stitcher Radio, SpotifyTunein or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Recent episodes are also available on YouTube.

Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find me on Twitter @nicolasterry and @WeekInHealthLaw.

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

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Jenn Oliva on “The Week in Health Law” Podcast

The Oklahoma opioid verdict was handed down on August 26 and, of course, there’s only one person to discuss it with, Jennifer OIiva. Professor Oliva is on the faculty at  at Seton Hall Law where she specializes in health, FDA, and evidence law. An honors graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Professor Oliva was a Public Interest Law Scholar and served as Executive Notes & Comments Editor of The Georgetown Law Journal. After law school, Professor Oliva clerked on the 10th and 3rd Circuit court of appeals. She also served as the Deputy State Solicitor of the State of Delaware. Read her smart scholarship here.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in health law and policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts or Google Play, listen at Stitcher Radio, Spotify, Tunein or Podbean.

Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find me on Twitter @nicolasterry and @WeekInHealthLaw.

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

The Week in Health Law podcast logo

Elizabeth Weeks on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

Recorded at the 2019 annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools, Professor Elizabeth Weeks, Associate Dean for Faculty Development & the J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law at the University of Georgia School of Law discusses the latest high profile ACA case, Texas v. U.S. Professor Weeks is a highly regarded health law scholar whose teaching and research interests include torts, health law, health care financing and regulation, and public health law.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in health law and policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts or Google Play, listen at Stitcher Radio, Spotify, Tunein or Podbean.

Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find me on Twitter @nicolasterry and @WeekInHealthLaw.

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

The Week in Health Law podcast logo

Fazal Khan on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

This episode was recorded at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing. This episode features a talk by Professor Fazal Khan who teaches Health Law & Policy, Bioethics, Public Health Law and International Products Liability at the University of Georgia School of Law. His current research focuses on several major themes: reform of the American health care system, the effect of globalization on health care, and the challenge of regulating emerging biotechnologies. His talk was on the financing of telemedicine and the slow alignment of the technologies with health care value and other models.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in health law and policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts or Google Play, listen at Stitcher Radio, Spotify, Tunein or Podbean.

Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find me on Twitter @nicolasterry and @WeekInHealthLaw.

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

The Week in Health Law podcast logo

John Cogan on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

Recorded at the 2019 annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in health care financing, this episode features a talk by Professor John Cogan from the University of Connecticut School of Law. Professor Cogan focuses his research and teaching on health care organizations and finance, health law and policy, federal health programs, health care fraud and abuse, and health insurance law. He is the co-author of a treatise on Medicare and Medicaid bankruptcy issues, as well as the author of numerous scholarly articles on a range of health insurance topics, including the Affordable Care Act and HIPAA. In this talk Professor Cogan discussed first, Medicaid: including expansion, work requirements, and the latest court decisions; second, Section 1557 and the proposed civil rights regulations; and third, the DeOtte v. Azar case and the resultant contraceptive mandate mess.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in health law and policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts or Google Play, listen at Stitcher Radio, Spotify, Tunein or Podbean.

Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find me on Twitter @nicolasterry and @WeekInHealthLaw.

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

the week in health law podcast logo

Julie Cantor and Ross Silverman on “The Week in Health Law” Podcast

We had two excellent guests this week. Dr. Julie Cantor is an adjunct faculty member at the UCLA School of Law. She is a graduate of Stanford University, UC Berkeley School of Law, and the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr Cantor has two decades of public policy and advocacy experience focused on federal healthcare policy. She has published broadly including in the New England Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, the Indiana Law Review, the ABA Human Rights Journal, the NYT Debate section, and has submitted amicus briefs in several Supreme Court cases.

Making a welcome return to the pod is Ross Silverman, Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, and holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Public Health Law at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. His research interests include legal, ethical and policy issues in public health and medicine, mobile health law and policy, interdisciplinary curriculum development, professional school admissions, medical humanities, human rights, and patient safety. Professor Silverman has published extensively on vaccination issues, for example here and here.

Our discussion topic rotates around the recent measles outbreaks and the public health and public health law issues they raise. Read More

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New TWIHL Podcast with Leo Beletsky and Jennifer Oliva

I am joined by guests Leo Beletsky and Jennifer Oliva.

Leo is a Professor of Law and Health Sciences and the Faculty Director of the Health in Justice Action Lab at Northeastern University School of Law, and he holds a joint appointment with the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. He has broad expertise and an enviable research and publication record in the public health impact of laws and their enforcement, with special focus on drug overdose, infectious disease transmission and the role of the criminal justice system as a structural determinant of health.

Jennifer is an Associate Professor at West Virginia University in the College of Law and School of Public Health. This Spring she has been a visiting research scholar at The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. In the fall, she will be joining the faculty at Seton Hall Law School. Her work has been published by or is forthcoming in the Duke Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, North Carolina Law Review, and the George Mason Law Review. Read More

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Claudia Haupt, Ignacio Cofone, Jessica Roberts, and Ana Santos Rutschman on The Week in Health Law Podcast

I am joined by guest host Claudia Haupt, Associate Professor of Law and Political Science Northeastern University School of Law and guests Ignacio Cofone, Assistant Professor of Law at McGill University, Jessica Roberts, the Director of the Health Law & Policy Institute and an Alumnae College Professor in Law, and Ana Santos Rutschman, Assistant Professor in the Center for Health Law Studies and the Center for International and Comparative Law at Saint Louis University.

We were gathered together in Boston for the Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations symposium organized by our friends at Northeastern University School of Law.  Read More

Don’t Ask What Money Can Do For the Opioid Plaintiffs, Ask What Pharma Can Do For Them

Jennifer Oliva’s insightful commentary on Oklahoma’s settlement with Purdue Pharma and the Sackler family detailed the settlement terms and posed important questions about the sufficiency of the agreed damages. I’d like to push a little further on a couple of fronts.

First, what does the journey from Cleveland, Ohio to Norman, Oklahoma tell us about the opioid litigation and the multi-district (MDL) process, some aspects of which I have addressed elsewhere. Second, while dollar figures (expressed in profits, harms, and even philanthropy) have dominated the headlines, should we be paying more attention to non-monetary remedies?

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