Healthcare Already Taking Center Stage in 2020 Democratic Primary Race

With Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) announcing that she was forming a Presidential exploratory committee, I suppose that means the 2020 Democratic Primary is off to the races. Joining her are some lower profile candidates, including John Delaney (former MD congressman), Richard Ojeda (WV state senator and former congressional candidate), Tulsi Gabbard (HI congresswoman), Julian Castro (former secretary of HUD). And within the last week, senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Kamala Harris (D-CA) put their hats in the ring.

While many issues are likely to play prominent roles in this campaign — immigration, taxes, inequality, housing, universal pre-k, college affordability, environment/climate change — healthcare is likely to play an outsized role after Democrats found it to be a winning issue in 2018.  Read More

"I voted" sticker on a finger.

Election Round Up: Medicaid Expansion is an Electoral Winner

With the midterm elections now behind us, I thought it was time to revisit a prior blog post where I discussed the prospects of state Medicaid expansion ballot propositions in Idaho, Utah, and Nebraska. I had predicted that despite the conservative nature of these states, Medicaid expansion would have a good chance of passing due to the program’s popularity.

Indeed, voters in all three states endorsed Medicaid expansion. It received 60 percent support in Idaho and 53 percent in both Utah and Nebraska.

The latter two results were closer than what I was expecting.

In the case of Utah this may because a funding mechanism was explicitly included as part of the ballot proposal. Regardless, this means that roughly 300,000 people will be newly eligible for Medicaid. Not only do may patients stand to benefit, but this could be a huge boon for struggle rural and safety-net hospitals. Read More

hand reaching for blue pills

The Rotten U.S. Antiparasitic Drug Market

Recently, there has been a lot of media attention on galling price hikes of generic drugs.

Historically, the social contract in pharmaceutical pricing has been tolerating expensive brand-name drugs while they have been on patent (a government-granted monopoly), followed by allowing low cost generics to rush to market after patent expiration. Yet these norms are now being challenged in the setting of increased generic manufacturer consolidation and single-source generic drugs.

Probably the most well known example is the case of Martin Shkreli (the so-called “Pharma Bro”) and Turing Pharmaceuticals, which bought out the rights of pyrimethamine (Daraprim), a key treatment for Toxoplasmosis and other infectious diseases, raising the price from $13.50 per pill to $750 per pill.

Note that even the pre-price hike price is significantly more than people other countries pay. In the UK it costs only $0.66 per pill and in Australia it is $0.18 per pill.

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