Congressmen are Concerned that Meaningful Use Stage 2 is Too Weak

By Leslie P. Francis

On October 4, four Republican Congressman, all with powerful positions concerning health care, wrote Secretary Sebelius urging suspension of “meaningful use” Stage 2 payments until a stronger program is in place. The Congressmen, Dave Camp (Chair of the House Ways & Means Committee), Wally Herger (Chair of the Ways & Means Subcommittee on Health), Fred Upton (Chair of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce), and Joe Pitts (Chair of the Energy & Commerce Subcommittee on Health), expressed concern that the Stage 2 regulations are too weak to insure genuine interoperability of electronic medical records.  As a result, the Congressmen contended, a great deal of taxpayer money will be wasted on payments for electronic records that do little to improve care or reduce costs.

The Congressmen have a point, despite the apparant partisanship of the letter.  There is a history of apparent reluctance on the part of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and with it HHS, to meet head-on industry complaints about the difficulty and costs of meeting standards or industry contentions that regulation will stifle innovation. Models of technology forcing that were employed in furtherance of environmental protection appear not to have been considered by ONC and HHS. The requirement to meet Meaningful Use Stage 2 was delayed by a year, from 2013 to 2014, to allow vendors more time to develop products. As I indicated in an earlier post, ONC has decided not to develop governance rules for health IT exchanges, out of industry concern for impact on innovation.   The stage 2 meaningful use requirements are not very strong, either, as the Congressmen point out. For example, core requirements are only that 50% of prescriptions be electronic, that only 50% of care referrals must be accompanied by electronic care summaries, that only 50% of patients must have access to health information (with 5% using it), and the EHR be capable of generating only one list of patients by condition. (For a handy comparison of stage 1 and stage 2 certification criteria, see here). All of these–and other–requirements are important to anticipated improvements in care to be garnered from the introduction of EHRs.  For example, generation of lists of patients with a specified condition (e.g. diabetes) may be an important way to ascertain the quality of patient management across a practice. Read More

More Bad News on Electronic Health Records

By David Orentlicher

During the debate over the Affordable Care Act, the Obama administration and other proponents of electronic health records (EHRs) cited a RAND study projecting cost-savings of $80 billion a year from EHRs. More recent data have cast doubt on those estimates. In March, for example, a study in Health Affairs found that physicians with access to electronic records were more likely to order MRI scans and other diagnostic tests. Last week, the New York Times reported that EHRs apparently lead hospitals and physicians to bill more aggressively for their services, using higher billing codes than justified by the services they provide. (For an earlier post on the disappointing impact of EHR, see here.)

[Cross-posted from HealthLawProf Blog]

ONC Backs Off Rule-making For Governance of Health Information Exchange

By Leslie Francis

Establishment of the infrastructure needed for the efficient, accurate, and secure exchange of health information is a crucial piece of improving care in the US.  Exchange fosters the ready availability of information, reducing redundancy and hopefully improving care quality.  To this end, proposals for a National Health Information Network were highly touted during the Bush Administration and continue to be supported by the Obama Administration, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) was established in 2004, and several federal advisory committees (the ONC Policy Committee and the ONC Standards Committee) were established by Congress in the HITECH Act in 2009.  Yet progress towards health information exchange remains halting at best–some hypothesize because of resistance within the private sector itself.  Recent developments at ONC are not encouraging.

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