Remembering Alan Wertheimer: Not Only a Philosopher’s Philosopher but a Lawyer’s Philosopher

When I was young I wanted to be Alan Wertheimer. When I first read him as an undergrad in courses in ethics and in law and philosophy he was one of the twentieth century writers in the field I most admired (along with Bernard Williams, Joel Feinberg, and a few other august names). His clarity, his insight, and his thinking on topics like exploitation and coercion served to me as a model for what I wanted to do with my life.

Thus it was a true honor to, like Emily, get to know him personally over the last few years. To all the superlatives about him that jump out from the page I can add that in real life he was a real mentsch, an amazing reader and mentor, who I will miss very much.

What is perhaps most impressive about Alan is that he was not only a consummate philosopher’s philosopher, but also a lawyer’s philosopher. A quick search I did for his work in the secondary sources database in Westlaw show 442 separate law papers citing to his work. He has had a significant impact on not only bioethics, but contracts, law and sexuality, constitutional law, and the legal profession. Indeed, as a parting salute to this great thinker let me highlight one of his papers that never achieved the recognition I think it deserved (it inspired some of my own writing): The Equalization of Legal Resources from 1988 in Philosophy and Public Affairs.

Goodbye Alan, you will be missed, but very much remembered.

I. Glenn Cohen

I. Glenn Cohen is the James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and current Faculty Director of the Petrie-Flom Center. A member of the inaugural cohort of Petrie-Flom Academic Fellows, Glenn was appointed to the Harvard Law School faculty in 2008. Glenn is one of the world's leading experts on the intersection of bioethics (sometimes also called "medical ethics") and the law, as well as health law. He also teaches civil procedure. From Seoul to Krakow to Vancouver, Glenn has spoken at legal, medical, and industry conferences around the world and his work has appeared in or been covered on PBS, NPR, ABC, CNN, MSNBC, Mother Jones, the New York Times, the New Republic, the Boston Globe, and several other media venues. He was the youngest professor on the faculty at Harvard Law School (tenured or untenured) both when he joined the faculty in 2008 (at age 29) and when he was tenured as a full professor in 2013 (at age 34).

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