New HHS Rules on Contraceptive Coverage

Today, HHS released new final regulations further clarifying the contraceptives coverage mandate.  I have not had the chance to fully digest these, but you can read them here.

Key nuggets, pulled straight from the text:

  • These final regulations continue to allow eligible organizations to choose between using EBSA Form 700 or the alternative process consistent with the Wheaton interim order. The alternative process provides that an eligible organization may notify HHS in writing of its religious objection to covering all or a subset of contraceptive services. The notice must include the name of the eligible organization and the basis on which it qualifies for an accommodation; its objection based on sincerely held religious beliefs to covering some or all contraceptive services, as applicable (including an identification of the subset of contraceptive services to which coverage the eligible organization objects, if applicable); the plan name and type (that is, whether it is a student health insurance plan within the meaning of 45 CFR 147.145(a) or a church plan within the meaning of ERISA section 3(33)); and the name and contact information for any of the plan’s third party administrators and health insurance issuers.
  • [T]hese final regulations extend the [existing] accommodation to a for-profit entity that is not publicly traded, is majority-owned by a relatively small number of individuals, and objects to providing contraceptive coverage based on its owners’ religious beliefs. This definition includes for-profit entities that are controlled and operated by individual owners who are likely to have associational ties, are personally identified with the entity, and can be regarded as conducting personal business affairs through the entity. . . . Based on the information available, it appears that the definition of closely held for-profit entity set forth in these final regulations includes all the for-profit corporations that have filed lawsuits alleging that the contraceptive coverage requirement, absent an accommodation, violates RFRA.

The upshot(s):

  • The extended accommodation allowing eligible objecting employers to notify the government rather than their insurer directly has simply been changed from an interim to a final rule.  This won’t make the pending non-profit litigation go away because these employers still object to two things: (1) having to provide their insurer’s contact information to the government so the government can notify the insurers of their obligations to provide free contraceptives; and (2) having to continue to maintain relationships with insurers who will provide contraceptives.
  • The extension of the accommodation’s eligibility criteria to include closely-held for-profit employers has now been made official following proposed regulation in the wake of Hobby Lobby. In the interim period after Hobby Lobby, objecting for-profits could simply object and avoid the mandate – and their insurers did not have to step in because the accommodation did not yet apply. Now it does, and these employers will likely raise similar objections to the accommodation as have already been raised by their non-profit counterparts.

Let’s just face it – litigation stemming from the ACA will never go away…

Holly Fernandez Lynch

Holly Fernandez Lynch

Holly Fernandez Lynch, JD, MBE, is the John Russell Dickson, MD Presidential Assistant Professor of Medical Ethics in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine. She is also the Assistant Faculty Director of Online Education, helping to lead the university’s first online master’s degree, the Master of Health Care Innovation, and other online offerings.

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