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A Delicate Balance: Proposed Regulations May Upset the Tension between Accessibility and Privacy of Health Information

This piece was part of a symposium featuring commentary from participants in the Center for Health Policy and Law’s annual conference, Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations, held on April 11-12, 2019 at Northeastern University School of Law. The symposium was originally posted through the Northeastern University Law Review Online Forum.

Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations Blog Symposium

We are pleased to present this symposium featuring commentary from participants in the Center for Health Policy and Law’s annual conference, Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations, held on April 11-12, 2019 at Northeastern University School of Law. Throughout the two-day conference, speakers and attendees discussed how innovations, including artificial intelligence, robotics, mobile technology, gene therapies, pharmaceuticals, big data analytics, tele- and virtual health care delivery, and new models of delivery, such as accountable care organizations (ACOs), retail clinics, and medical-legal partnerships (MLPs), have entered and changed the healthcare market. More dramatic innovations and market disruptions are likely in the years to come. These new technologies and market disruptions offer immense promise to advance health care quality and efficiency, and improve provider and patient engagement. Success will depend, however, on careful consideration of potential perils and well-planned interventions to ensure new methods ultimately further, rather than diminish, the health of patients, especially those who are the most vulnerable.

In his piece for the Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations blog symposium, Oliver Kim emphasizes the important role trust plays in the provider-patient relationship. Kim unpacks the challenges that come with the introduction and incorporation of new health technology, and further cautions against the potential for erosion of trust when introducing third-parties into the relationship.

A Delicate Balance: Proposed Regulations May Upset the Tension between Accessibility and Privacy of Health Information

By Oliver Kim

Northeastern University School of Law’s “Promises and Perils” conference allowed my coauthor and me to continue the exploration of legal, policy, and ethical issues in the development and use of “disruptive technologies” in health care. See Ne. Univ. Sch. L., Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations, (last visited Oct. 4, 2019); Oliver J. Kim, The Devil is in the Data, Balkinization (Nov. 3, 2018, 11:00 AM). The bedrock of the provider-patient relationship is trust, and that same level of trust must exist in the world of disruptive technology, such as digital health, if disruptive technologies will be welcomed by patients and consumers.

Read the rest of the post at Northeastern University Law Review Forum.

Oliver Kim

Oliver Kim

Oliver is an adjunct professor with the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and a policy consultant in Washington, DC. He has over fifteen years of federal and state legislative and policy experience, including serving for eight years as a senior advisor to Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and two as deputy director for the Special Committee on Aging under Chairman Bill Nelson (D-FL). He was selected for the Woodrow Wilson foreign policy fellowship, the AcademyHealth Health Policy in Action award, the Hartford Foundation Change AGEnt program, and the American Council of Young Political Leaders’ international exchange program. He received his BA from Indiana University, JD from University of Minnesota, and LLM from the Georgetown University Law Center.

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