a stethoscope tied around a dollar bill, with a bottle of pills nearby

Can We Expect Legislation on Surprise Medical Billing? I’d Be Surprised

By Abe Sutton

Surprise medical billing has emerged as a top political priority amid a torrent of complaints about expensive balance billing.

Despite leaders such as President Trump, former Vice President Biden, and members of the 116th Congress pledging to address surprise medical billing, federal legislation is unlikely, due to powerful health associations’ divergent interests. To shake legislation loose, the President would need to publicly take a side and expend political capital on a creative solution.

In this piece, I walk through why federal legislative action has been stymied to date, and what it would take to get surprise medical billing legislation over the line.

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Illustration of a family and large clipboard with items in a list checked off. All are underneath a large blue umbrella

Third Time’s a Charm: Georgia’s 1332 Waiver Application

By Abe Sutton

The Georgia Access Model

Georgia's waiver presents a pathway for other states
Other states can follow Georgia’s lead in pursuing innovative 1332 waivers to encourage choice and competition. “A Pathway to Heaven” by ^riza^ is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

In December 2019, Georgia applied for a state relief and empowerment waiver available under Section 1332 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Section 1332 lets states alter select ACA requirements to find the approach that is right for their state and encourage insurance coverage innovation. Georgia has released two prior versions of this waiver proposal; the state’s most recent revision to its 1332 waiver application offers a new vision for the individual market and a potential roadmap for other states. The innovation, the Georgia Access Model, accompanies the now-traditional reinsurance component included in prior 1332 waivers.

The Georgia Access Model shifts Georgia off of healthcare.gov. It instead opts for a decentralized enrollment system that makes plans available through the commercial market. Georgia argues this will increase individual market enrollment and reduce premiums. In this piece, I address some criticisms of the model and present an argument for approving Georgia’s waiver.

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