Empty hospital bed.

New Data Reignites Concerns over COVID-19 and Nursing Homes in New York State

By James W. Lytle 

Concerns over New York State’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly with respect to its treatment of nursing homes, have recently re-emerged in light of a new report and court ruling related to the matter.

Almost from the outset of the pandemic, the State faced scrutiny as to whether it was accurately reporting deaths of nursing home patients.

After nursing homes complained in April about the lack of PPE and other resources to combat the pandemic, Governor Andrew Cuomo responded that it was not the state’s responsibility, and asked the Department of Health and the Attorney General to launch investigations into nursing homes’ response to the pandemic.

Nine months later, in late January 2021, the report by New York State Attorney General Letitia James of the nursing home investigation was released.

Among the report’s headlines, the Attorney General’s preliminary analysis found that the Department of Health had undercounted deaths of nursing home residents due to COVID-19 by about 50%, largely because of the failure of the State to count the deaths of those residents who were transferred to hospitals immediately prior to their deaths. No other state excluded patients who had been transferred before death to hospitals from their nursing home fatality reports.

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Doctor or surgeon with organ transport after organ donation for surgery in front of the clinic in protective clothing.

How to Encourage Organ Donation

By James W. Lytle

Last week, Bill of Health published a Q&A with Phil Walton, the Project Lead for Deemed Consent Legislation with the National Health Service Blood and Transplant Division, and Alexandra Glazier, the President/CEO of the New England Donor Services.

In the first part of this conversation, Walton and Glazier described the various frameworks undergirding organ donor registries in their home countries. Walton detailed the “deemed consent” or “opt-out” registry employed by Wales and England, while Glazier detailed the opt-in, prompted choice framework in the U.S.

In this second installment, Walton and Glazier discuss strategies to encourage organ donation, regardless of the opt-in or opt-out framework. The conversation also touched on health disparities and strategies to address them.

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adult and child hands holding red heart, organ donation concept image.

Opt-in vs. Opt-out Organ Donation Schemes: Evidence from the US and UK

By James W. Lytle

We need to encourage organ donation. In the U.S. alone, even with a record number of about 40,000 transplants in 2019 and some progress made towards closing the gap, approximately 108,000 Americans are on the waiting list.

In considering the best way to increase organ donation, much of the debate has focused on how to make organ donor registries more successful: nothing facilitates the prospect for organ donation more than knowing that a potential donor has already indicated their intention to donate.

Should registries, like those in the U.S., require people to elect to join (the “opt-in” approach) or should they presume consent to organ donation and register everyone except those who explicitly “opt-out,” as is the case in certain other countries?

I asked two transplant professionals, one from the U.S. and one from Wales, to help consider this question and related issues involving organ donation.

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