New Virtual Issue of Journal of Law and the Biosciences: Editors’ Choice 2020

In this virtual issue from Journal of Law and the Biosciences, we present 17 informative articles, published in 2017-2019, hand-picked by the journal’s three Editors-in-Chief: Nita Farahany from Duke University, Hank Greely from Stanford University, and Glenn Cohen from Harvard Law School.

This specially curated article collection examines a range of matters focusing on the intersection of law and the biosciences, including whether a complete ban on surrogacy is compatible with the American Convention on Human Rights, what role should law play when genetic privacy is concerned, or what opportunities and challenges there are for forensic psychiatry regarding brain-based mind reading.

In selecting articles for this virtual issue, the Editorial Board aims to emphasize the high-quality studies published in Journal of Law and the Biosciences and hopes these will stimulate further research in this new important field.

Check out the full collection!

covid-19 virus.

New COVID-19 Resources from the Petrie-Flom Center

The COVID-19 pandemic has raised many health law, policy, and bioethical questions. The Petrie-Flom Center is working hard to address many of the issues raised by the pandemic through our scholarship, events, and commentary in the news.

In the interest of sharing this knowledge, the Petrie-Flom Center has collected these resources on a new page on our website. In addition to a list of featured resources is a broader collection of our work on COVID-19. The page is dynamic and frequently updated. Check it out here.

Call for Submissions: Journal of Law and Biosciences, “Law and Ethics in the Time of a Global Pandemic”

The Journal of Law and the Biosciences (JLB) is soliciting essays, commentaries, or short articles for a special issue on “Law and Ethics in the Time of a Global Pandemic.” For this issue we especially encourage shorter pieces, of roughly 1500 to 5000 words. If any particular aspect of how this pandemic will affect some part of the law—from lease terms to courtroom procedures to constitutional questions about mandatory testing—intrigues you, write it up and send it in.

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Illustration of four people helping each other climb progressively taller stacks of books

What’s Missing From Biotech Graduate Education? With Free Course, RA Capital Attempts to Fill the Gaps

By Jessica Sagers

As a PhD student in the life sciences at Harvard, I attended almost every career seminar that came through my inbox. I had no idea what I wanted to do after finishing my research doctorate, but I was certain that it wasn’t more cell culture.

The walls of my academic bubble were so thick that even as a budding cell biologist, I’d managed to hear almost nothing about Boston’s booming biotech industry. “Going into industry” was regarded as an “alternative career,” to the point where it sounded like taking a job outside of academia was tantamount to abandoning science. Besides, all my training had been in basic science. The coursework I’d excelled in, from neurobiology to biophysics, did not equip me to translate what I’d learned to the business world.

During my final PhD year, curiosity about the biotech sector drove me to accept an internship at RA Capital Management, a life science-focused investment firm in Boston. Dr. Peter Kolchinsky (Harvard Program in Virology, ’01), Founder and Managing Partner of RA Capital, brought me and a group of fellow PhD students on board to help achieve his vision of providing more pragmatic, focused training to scientists and professionals interested in working in biotechnology. Together, we designed a short, advanced course on the business of biotech designed to fit the practical needs of late-stage graduate students and early-career professionals.

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Photograph of a green cow statue in a field

Exploring the Future of Meat: Academy of Food Law & Policy 2nd Annual Conference at Georgia State University, Dec. 10, 2019

By Nicole Negowetti

Sustainably feeding a growing population with healthy diets is a pressing global challenge. The role of meat in such diets is a deeply contentious issue that has public health, animal welfare, food systems, farming, and environmental experts and advocates weighing in on the issue. As we learn more about the impacts of meat production and consumption on human and environmental health and animal welfare, meat consumption is changing. In North America, eaters are heeding recommendations to reduce, replace, or eliminate meat in their diets; however, global meat production and consumption continues to rise.

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Image of a gavel and stethoscope on top of each other

Now Hiring for Fall 2019: Jaharis Faculty Fellow in Health Law and IP/IT

An endowment at the DePaul University College of Law funds a faculty fellowship program for scholars to create and disseminate scholarship and teach courses where two dynamic legal fields are increasingly intersecting—health law and intellectual property/information technology, broadly construed.

The fellowship is designed to encourage scholars interested in entering a career in legal academia in these fields. The Jaharis Faculty Fellow will work with and be mentored by faculty from DePaul’s nationally-ranked Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI) and Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology (CIPLIT®). Read More

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen Appointed James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law

Harvard Law School Dean John F. Manning honored Petrie-Flom Center Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen  on the occasion of his appointment as the James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law at a lecture and reception yesterday evening.

Prof. Cohen presented his work, “The Second Reproductive Revolution: From Gene Editing, to Uterus Transplants, to Embryos Derived from Our Skin – How Technology Is Changing Reproduction,” which will be the subject of a forthcoming book.

Cohen, a popular professor at Harvard and a first generation college graduate, was the youngest professor on the faculty at Harvard Law School (tenured or untenured) both when he joined the faculty in 2008 (at age 29) and when he was tenured as a full professor in 2013 (at age 34).

Glenn’s current projects relate to health information technologies, mobile health, reproduction/reproductive technology, research ethics, rationing in law and medicine, health policy, FDA law and to medical tourism – the travel of patients who are residents of one country, the “home country,” to another country, the “destination country,” for medical treatment. His past work has included projects on end of life decision-making, FDA regulation and commodification. He is the founding editor of this blog.

The Bill of Health community wishes him a heartfelt congratulations!

Petrie-Flom Student Fellowship Now Accepting Applications

What do a MacArthur Genius award winner, several health law professors at top schools, executive directors of leading health law centers, an associate chief counsel of the FDA, and partners and associates at top health care law firms all have in common? The Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship!

The Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship is a competitive one-year program designed to support Harvard graduate students interested in pursuing independent scholarly projects related to health law policy, biotechnology, and bioethics. With intensive mentorship from Petrie-Flom Center affiliates, student fellows are expected to produce a piece of publishable scholarship by the end of the academic year, at which point they may choose to be awarded a modest stipend and/or academic credit. Student fellows also blog regularly at Bill of Health, the Center’s blog, where their work receives substantial public exposure. Student fellows will receive training for online scholarly publishing; participate in and organize Center events; and enroll in the Health Law, Policy, Bioethics, and Biotechnology Workshop, which provides the opportunity to interact with leading scholars in the field.

 

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Call for Proposals: Addressing the Health Care Needs of Justice-Involved Populations

The Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy at Loyola University Chicago School of Law and Annals of Health Law & Life Sciences invite original submissions for presentations at our Thirteenth Annual Health Law Symposium: Addressing the Health Care Needs of Justice-Involved Populations. The Symposium will take place at Loyola University Chicago School of Law on Friday, November 15, 2019 beginning at 9:00am.

The Symposium will explore legal barriers that justice-involved populations face in accessing health care, and address how those barriers can be alleviated. “Justice-involved populations” generally refers to individuals who are incarcerated in prisons, jails, immigrant detention centers, juvenile detention centers, on probation, or individuals who are otherwise involved with the U.S. justice system. Read More

World map where continents are in blue pixels

Jennifer Prah Ruger: The World Needs a New Global Health Architecture

In a world beset by serious and unconscionable health disparities, by dangerous contagions that can circle our globalized planet in hours, and by a bewildering confusion of health actors and systems, humankind needs a new vision, a new architecture, new coordination among renewed systems to ensure central health capabilities for all. In her new book, “Global Health Justice and Governance,” Dr. Prah Ruger lays out the critical problems facing the world today and offers a new theory of justice and governance as a way to resolve these seemingly intractable issues.  Read More