Limelight v. Akamai: Implications for Medical Method Patents

By Rachel Sachs

Last month, as it wrapped up the 2014 Term, the Supreme Court decided a patent law case that could have a major impact on method patents in the medical arena. No, I’m not talking about Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank, the most Rorschach-like of the Term’s many patent opinions. I’m talking about Limelight Networks v. Akamai Technologies, Inc., in which the Supreme Court unanimously reversed the Federal Circuit’s ruling on the scintillating question of divided infringement under 35 U.S.C. § 271(b).

In Limelight, a splintered en banc decision, a majority of the Federal Circuit had overturned prior case law in ruling that liability for induced infringement of a method claim under § 271(b) was possible where no single entity had performed all the steps of that claim, but where those steps were divided between two or more parties, one of whom had induced the other(s) to infringe. (Previously, various opinions had held that induced infringement under § 271(b) required a single actor, just like direct infringement under current § 271(a) precedent.) In a unanimous opinion by Justice Alito, the Supreme Court reversed, essentially reinstating the single entity rule by holding that direct infringement under § 271(a) is required for inducement liability under § 271(b). Read More

New Blogger, Academic Fellow Rachel Sachs

sachs_peoplePlease join us in welcoming new blogger Rachel Sachs to Bill of Health!

Rachel earned her J.D. in 2013 magna cum laude from Harvard Law School, where she was the Articles Chair of the Harvard Law Review and a student fellow with both the Petrie-Flom Center and the John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics, and Business. Rachel has also earned a Masters in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health, during which she interned at the United States Department of Health and Human Services. She holds an A.B. in Bioethics from Princeton University. After law school Rachel clerked for the Honorable Richard A. Posner of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. She will be joining the Petrie-Flom Center as an Academic Fellow in August 2014.

Rachel’s primary research interests lie at the intersection of patent law and public health, with a particular focus on problems of innovation and access and the ways in which law helps or hinders these problems. Her past scholarship has examined the interactions between patent law and FDA regulation in the area of diagnostic tests, and explored the mechanisms behind the passage of patent-related legislation. Her current scholarship applies this focus on innovation and access to the intersection of patent law and drug reimbursement policies.

Representative Publications:  Read More