Image of a surgery room with a robot whose screen has a doctor with a stethoscope

The Problem With Doctors Communicating via Robot is Attitudes About Technology, Not Poorly Communicating Doctors

By Evan Selinger and Arthur Caplan

Perhaps you’ve seen the debate? A physician used video chat technology to inform a hospitalized Ernest Quintana and his family that he would be dying sooner than they expected. After he passed away, they objected to how the news was delivered. Over at Slate, Joel Zivot an anesthesiologist and ICU physician, responded to the uproar with an essay titled, “In Defense of Telling Patients They’re Dying Via Robot.” Read More

Blue background that reads "facebook" with a silhouette of a person looking down on his phone in front

On Social Suicide Prevention, Don’t Let the Perfect be the Enemy of the Good

In a piece in The Guardian and a forthcoming article in the Yale Journal of Law and Technology, Bill of Health contributor Mason Marks recently argued that Facebook’s suicide prediction algorithm is dangerous and ought to be subject to rigorous regulation and transparency requirements. Some of his suggestions (in particular calls for more data and suggestions that are really more about how we treat potentially suicidal people than about how we identify them) are powerful and unobjectionable.

But Marks’s core argument—that unless Facebook’s suicide prediction algorithm is subject to the regulatory regime of medicine and operated on an opt-in basis it is morally problematic—is misguided and alarmist. Read More

ONC’s Proposed Rule is a Breakthrough in Patient Empowerment

By Adrian Gropper

Imagine solving wicked problems of patient matching, consent, and a patient-centered longitudinal health record while also enabling a world of new healthcare services for patients and physicians to use. The long-awaited Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on information blocking from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) promises nothing less. 

Having data automatically follow the patient is a laudable goal but difficult for reasons of privacy, security, and institutional workflow. The privacy issues are clear if you use surveillance as the mechanism to follow the patient. Do patients know they’re under surveillance? By whom? Is there one surveillance agency or are there dozens in real-world practice? Can a patient choose who does the surveillance and which health encounters, including behavioral health, social relationships, location, and finance are excluded from the surveillance? Read More