Elderly drivers and fatal accidents: Is the doctor responsible?

[posted on behalf of Art Caplan]

Should a physician be held responsible if an elderly patient causes a car accident while driving?

A Los Angeles jury recently decided that Dr. Arthur Daigneault was not responsible for the wrongful death of 90-year-old William Powers, whose longtime partner, a dementia patient, drove into the path of an oncoming car, according to a report by The Los Angeles Times. The driver Lorraine Sullivan, 85, survived, but Powers died of his injuries weeks after the crash.

The Orange County, Calif. jury cleared Daigneault, but the case raises the question of whether the physician should have reported his patient — who had suffered memory loss since 2007 and was prescribed an Alzheimer’s drug in 2009 — to local health authorities or urged the California Department of Motor Vehicles revoke her license.

Read the rest over at NBC News Vitals.

Discrimination in the Doctor-Patient Relationship

By Holly Fernandez Lynch

Nir Eyal’s post below has teed up the issue of doctors refusing to accept patients for reasons that seem to be pretty questionable.  The latest example has to do with obesity, but there are plenty of others having to do with vaccination status, sexual orientation, and the like.  Sometimes these refusals can be clearly categorized as conscientious objections (religious or otherwise).  And other times they are  a bit fuzzier, such as when the refusals are rooted in attempts to drive changes in behavior  (e.g., “get vaccinated or you can’t be my patient”) or when they stem from having inadequate staffing or equipment.  But for the patient, all of these refusals can feel discriminatory.   And that raises the obvious question: can doctors legally discriminate against patients?  The answer: it depends.  Sometimes yes, and sometimes no.

First, bear with me while I make the obligatory pitch for my book, Conflicts of Conscience in Health Care, which is now a few years old, but the issues are still very much live.  In that book, I delve deeply into the question of how to balance provider conscience and patient access.  In general, I argue that it is important to protect provider conscience, to a point (or points) – and those points have to do with burden on the patient and avoidance of invidious discrimination.   Read More

No Doctor for the Obese?

by Nir Eyal

Yesterday, Boston public radio station WBUR interviewed a Massachusetts primary care physician who refuses to admit new obese patients. She claims that it’s because she lacks proper equipment, but she seems to have mixed motives. Earlier she had admitted that it’s rather because she feels that if they don’t lose the weight, “I’m paying the cost of other people’s choices.” I bet if she lacked the equipment for wheelchair-bound patients, she would go buy it.

In an upcoming post (09/07: update here), Holly Fernandez Lynch, who, along with Glenn Cohen, gets kudus for kicking off this blog, will explain whether it’s legal for doctors to reject obese patients. But before rejecting them becomes the next trend, is it right?

A whopping 35.7% of Americans are obese, and the trend continues upwards. Obesity increases risk for heart disease, stroke, type II diabetes, and various cancers. It costs the system a fortune. We must tackle this problem head on. But conditioning physician access on weight loss is not the way. Read More