One pill on mint green background.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet Sarpatwari, Alexander Egilman, Aviva Wang, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, policy analyses, and editorials on health law and policy issues.

Below are the citations for papers identified from the month of May. The selections feature topics ranging from a discussion of how the US Patent and Trademark Office could more closely scrutinize applications for drug patents whose siblings have been discontinued in other jurisdictions, to an evaluation of FDA advisory committee referrals for new drugs approved from 2010-2021, to an analysis of the patents and regulatory exclusivities on inhalers approved from 1986-2020. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

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hand opening white plastic pvc window at home.

It’s Time for the Federal Government to Get Back to Protecting the Nation Against COVID-19

By Jennifer S. Bard

Over the past two years, the Supreme Court has shown unprecedented hostility to efforts by both state and federal government to stop the spread of what every day turns out to be an even more deadly pandemic.

These decisions are devastating, and likely signal a continued attack on government authority, but they are not a reason to give up.

The federal government can still use its vast resources to slow the spread and continued mutation of the virus, by telling people what it knows of the danger, and what it knows about how to mitigate it.

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A male pharmacist is examining a drug from a pharmacy inventory.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet Sarpatwari, Alexander Egilman, Aviva Wang, andAaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, policy analyses, and editorials on health law and policy issues.

Below are the citations for papers identified from the month of April. The selections feature topics ranging from a discussion of manufacturer’s restricted delivery of 340B drugs to contract pharmacies and ensuing litigation, to an analysis mapping the European patent landscape for medical uses of known products, to an evaluation of the clinical benefit of novel drugs approved in the U.S. from 2018-2019. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

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United States Capitol Building - Washington, DC.

Psychedelic Policy on the Federal Level: Key Takeaways from a Petrie-Flom Center Panel

By James R. Jolin

To navigate the myriad interests and stakes involved in creating federal psychedelic policy, the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School convened a virtual panel discussion with three leading psychedelic policy advocates.

The conversation was situated against the backdrop of the “psychedelics renaissance” in the United States, which has been fueled by a wave of local and state legislation reducing or eliminating the criminal penalties associated with these substances.

Though many localities have made significant strides in addressing the legal questions surrounding psychedelic substances such as psilocybin and dimethyltryptamine (DMT), federal policymakers have not pursued similar initiatives.

Suggestions and considerations for federal psychedelic policy thus formed the substance of the discussion among the panelists:

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Pill pack.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet Sarpatwari, Alexander Egilman, Aviva Wang, andAaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, policy analyses, and editorials on health law and policy issues.

Below are the citations for papers identified from the month of March. The selections feature topics ranging from a discussion of patient assistance programs and the Anti-Kickback Statute, to an analysis of the effects of state opioid prescribing laws on the use of opioids and other pain treatments, to an evaluation of the association between regulatory drug safety advisories and changes in drug use. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

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Group of athletic adult men and women performing sit up exercises to strengthen their core abdominal muscles at fitness training.

Exercise Equipment Advertisements and Consumer Distrust

By Jack Becker

Are you ready to learn about “the most innovative piece of exercise equipment ever”? To take advantage of “the momentum of gravity to target your entire midsection”? Doesn’t everybody want to “lose those love handles nobody loves”? To finally “have the flat washboard abs and the sexy v-shape [they’ve] always wanted”? Within “just weeks, not months,” anybody can “firm and flatten their stomach.” And “best of all, it’s fun and easy and takes just three minutes a day.”

Despite its endorsement from an expert fitness celebrity and customer testimonials, you might be skeptical of the Ab Circle Pro’s claims. After all, can you really cut out five minutes from the iconic 8-Minute Abs routine?

Massive and misleading promises are an unfortunate reality for many exercise equipment advertisements. Illegitimate advertising claims can harm consumers and impact overall consumer trust, which creates an uphill battle for honest companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) already regulates exercise equipment, but supplementing its efforts with more consumer education and industry self-regulation could be a winning combination to restore trust in the fitness industry.

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Doctor or surgeon with organ transport after organ donation for surgery in front of the clinic in protective clothing.

Pig Hearts for Humans and the FDA

By Jacob Balamut

David Bennett, a man who recently underwent the world’s first successful xenotransplantation organ surgery, died last month after a sudden and as yet unexplained period of rapid deterioration.

Bennett, who was 57 years old, had been suffering from end-stage heart disease. With limited options for treatment, he underwent an experimental emergency procedure to replace his damaged heart with a genetically modified pig’s heart. The pig was genetically modified to limit the likelihood that Bennett’s immune system would reject the heart.

Many researchers and clinicians alike see the potential for genetically modified animal organs to serve as a solution to our organ transplant and supply issues. The Health Resources and Services Administration estimates that 17 people die per day on the candidate waiting list. These deaths are the result of a lack of supply of organs, which has been a longstanding issue within the United States.

However, currently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any genetically modified or pure animal organs for xenotransplantation in humans. For the surgery to go forward in Bennett’s case, the team had to submit a request to the FDA seeking to use the pig heart in the emergency procedure (so-called “compassionate use”). The lack of approved xenotransplantation products stems from a lack of safety data and concerns regarding the potential for cross-species infections to occur.

In 2016, the FDA updated previously existing guidance for xenotransplantation. The purpose of the guidance was to inform the industry of how the FDA would be handling xenotransplantation applications and to provide recommendations.  In order for xenotransplantation products to be approved, the following process must occur.

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Businessman's hands typing on laptop keyboard in morning light

Microdosing at Work: Business and Legal Implications

By Vincent Sliwoski

In light of the widespread cultural and business culture adoption of microdosing, private sector employers should reconsider the implications of a blanket prohibition on workplace use of controlled substances.

Microdosing is the practice of ingesting subperceptual amounts of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin mushrooms or LSD. People microdose for a variety of reasons. These may include medical reasons, such as the treatment of anxiety, depression or attention disorders; or they may include “performance” reasons, like attempts to increase productivity, creativity or awareness.

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POPLAR affiliated reseachers

Introducing Affiliated Researchers for the Project on Psychedelics Law and Regulation

(Clockwise from top left: Kwasi Adusei, Ismail Lourido Ali, Jonathan Perez-Reyzin, Dustin Marlan.)

We are excited to welcome our inaugural group of affiliated researchers for the Project on Psychedelics Law and Regulation (POPLAR). Through regular contributions to Bill of Health, as well as workshops and other projects, POPLAR affiliated researchers will share their expertise and perspectives on developments in psychedelics law and policy. We look forward to learning from and sharing their insights with our audiences. Keep an eye out for their bylines!

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LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM- 1 APRIL 2015: A newspaper rack holding several international newspapers, such as The International New York Times, USA Today, Irish Times, Londra Sera and Corriere Della Sera.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet SarpatwariBeatrice Brown, Aviva Wang, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, policy analyses, and editorials on health law and policy issues.

Below are the citations for papers identified from the month of February. The selections feature topics ranging from an analysis of how the Bayh-Dole Act can be updated to promote innovation and affordable access to drugs developed using federal funds, to an examination of the upcoming reauthorization of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act and its implications for FDA regulation and policies, to a systematic review and meta-analysis of preapproval clinical testing of biosimilars used in the treatment of cancer. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

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