hand holding cell phone in open palm with pharmaceutical icons - pills, vial, and shopping cart - above.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy 

By Ameet Sarpatwari, Alexander Egilman, Aviva Wang, andAaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, policy analyses, and editorials on health law and policy issues.

Below are the citations for papers identified from the month of September. The selections feature topics ranging from an examination of Park doctrine prosecutions of executives of pharmaceutical and medical device companies, an analysis of patent thickets covering biologic drugs, and a discussion of product hopping strategies among manufacturers of inhalers. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

Read More

Picture of doctor neck down using an ipad with digital health graphics superimposed

Everything You Wanted to Know About Expanded Access but Were Afraid to Ask, Part 2

By Alison Bateman-House, Hayley M. Belli, and Sage Gustafson

This series is adapted from a webinar hosted by PRIM&R on August 5, 2021: IRB Review of Expanded Access Protocols that Collect Real World Data: Considerations and Guidance. Read Part 1 here.

Part 2: Possible Value of “Real World Data” Collected from Expanded Access

Real world data (RWD) are data relating to patient health status and/or the delivery of health care such as medical bills/claims, electronic health records, and product/disease registries. RWD are derived from sources outside of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Real world evidence (RWE) may be derived from the analysis of quality RWD.

Read More

Gamblers make bets at the roulette table in a casino.

We All Stand to Benefit from Biden’s $2 Billion Bet on the Bioeconomy

By Matthew Chun

Business is bustling for biotechnology and biomanufacturing. On September 12, 2022, President Biden signed an executive order, launching a “whole-of-government approach to advance biotechnology and biomanufacturing.” And two days later, he backed it up with a national summit and a $2 billion spending plan.

But who stands to benefit from this large commitment of federal money? We all do.

Read More

Washington, USA- January13, 2020: FDA Sign outside their headquarters in Washington. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or USFDA) is a federal agency of the USA.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet Sarpatwari, Liam Bendicksen, Alexander Egilman, andAaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, policy analyses, and editorials on health law and policy issues.

Below are the citations for papers identified from the month of August. The selections feature topics ranging from a discussion of opportunities for improving the use of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committees, an analysis of the key patents covering drugs recently approved by the FDA, and an examination of high-risk cardiovascular devices approved by the FDA for use in children and adolescents. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

Read More

Tilpath Valley Biodiversity Park spreads over an area of 69.56 ha on the Southern Ridge that is contiguous with Aravalli ranges of Haryana, in south Delhi, New Delhi India.

Proposed Amendments Would Make Foreign Investment in India’s Biological Resources Easier

By Aparajita Lath

Indian lawmakers are currently debating proposed amendments that would make it easier for foreign investors to research and develop products from native biological resources, such as plants.

India is one of the 17 internationally recognized mega biodiversity countries, and hosts four of the 35 globally recognized biodiversity hotspots.

Since countries have sovereign rights over their biological resources, Indian companies enjoy easier access to and use of these biological resources for various commercial applications, including pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and biotechnology. Foreign companies and Indian companies with any foreign participation in share capital or management are strictly regulated.

Read More

Businessman crossing fingers behind his back.

Get Your Story Straight: Patent Office Cracks Down on Inconsistent Statements Made Before the FDA

By Matthew Chun

In an effort to “promote robust and reliable patents” and increase access to life-saving drugs, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) recently issued a Federal Register Notice clarifying the responsibilities of individuals involved in the patent application process.

In the July 29, 2022 notice, the USPTO set forth its views on the “duty of disclosure” and “duty of reasonable inquiry,” emphasizing the importance of consistency between statements made to the USPTO, the FDA, and other governmental agencies. While the goals of the Federal Register Notice are certainly noble, its disruptive practical effects leave much to be desired.

Read More

pills

Everything You Wanted to Know About Expanded Access but Were Afraid to Ask, Part 1

By Alison Bateman-House, Hayley M. Belli, and Sage Gustafson

This series is adapted from a webinar hosted by PRIM&R on August 5, 2021: IRB Review of Expanded Access Protocols that Collect Real World Data: Considerations and Guidance.

Part 1: What is Expanded Access and How Does it Work?

Expanded Access (EA) is a regulatory mechanism that allows patients, through their physicians, to request the use of an unapproved medical product in a treatment setting.

Read More

Bill of Health - Globe and vaccine, covid vaccine

Reclaiming Global Public Health

By Zain Rizvi

By December 2020, the world had astonishingly powerful tools against COVID-19. New mRNA vaccines, underpinned by decades of public investment, had been authorized by global regulators. Yet the promise of the vaccines was unevenly realized: deep fault lines emerged between those who were able to secure vaccines and those left behind, or what South Africa’s president Cyril Ramaphosa called “vaccine apartheid.”

Dose shortages elevated the role of pharmaceutical executives. Fielding calls from heads of state, they decided what vaccine deliveries to prioritize, shaping which countries could protect lives and livelihoods. The answer to one of the most important public health questions of our time — who gets access to vaccines? — was mostly determined neither by political representatives nor scientists, but by corporate executives.

Read More