9/16 Workshop: Kimani Paul-Emile on Race, Ex-Offender Status, and Employment Discrimination

On Monday, September 16, the Petrie-Flom Center’s Health Law Policy and Bioethics Workshop will host Kimani Paul-Emile of the Fordham University School of Law. Paul-Emile’s presentation is titled “Beyond Title VII: Rethinking Race, Ex-offender Status And Employment Discrimination In The Information Age.”

All meetings of the Workshop are free and open to the public. You can download Paul-Emile’s paper and view the full schedule of upcoming workshops here.

Dov Fox on the Future of Genetic Privacy

Bill of Health contributor Dov Fox has a new op-ed at the Huffington Post on “junk” DNA and the future of genetic privacy in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s ruling, in Maryland v. King, that police may collect DNA from people under arrest. Fox argues,

The next great controversy over forensic DNA won’t have anything to do with whether police can test “junk” DNA from people whose identity they already know. It will be about whether police can look “more broadly” at the “other stuff” that genetic information can reveal from people who aren’t yet known to them. That our DNA could serve as an eyewitness has powerful implications, beyond individual privacy, for the pervasive role of race in the investigation of crime.

Read the full piece here.

Racism in Transplant Denial? Or Too Few Hearts To Go Around?

By Michele Goodwin

Anthony Stokes, a fifteen year old kid from Decatur County, Georgia, is expected to die in a matter of months, according to his doctors at the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.  Maybe, they say, he will live for six months.  Who knows?  Anthony suffers from an enlarged, increasingly less functional heart.  His condition is not unusual, and a reasonably effective cure is at hand: a heart transplant. (Learn more about Anthony’s story here.)

However, Anthony has become the latest victim of a dysfunctional U.S. transplantation system, which tempts Americans with a transplant waiting list, but kicks them off if they become too sick or too old.  The problem is that there are too few organs to meet demand, and this perennial problem receives far too little attention from Congress.  Indeed, the U.S. transplantation list, coordinated by the United Network for Organ Sharing, UNOS, (a private organization that coordinates significant aspects of the U.S. transplant system) is so overcrowded that patients increasingly turn to black markets in India, China, Pakistan, South Africa, and other countries if they hope to survive.  (Learn more about that here.) Congressional hearings document Chinese prisoners dying and shortly thereafter Americans receiving organs.

Anthony’s family and some local organizations claim that racism is behind doctors refusing to place the boy on the transplant list.  Anthony is African American.  They ask, what is the harm in letting him on the list?

Read More