Los Angeles, California, United States. June 23, 2021: #FreeBritney rally at LA Downtown Grand Park during a conservatorship hearing for Britney Spears.

There’s More to Decision-Making Capacity than Cognitive Function

The Health Law, Policy, Bioethics, and Biotechnology Workshop provides a forum for discussion of new scholarship in these fields from the world’s leading experts. Though the Workshop is typically open to the public, it is not currently, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, many of our presenters will contribute blog posts summarizing their work, which we are happy to share here on Bill of Health.

By James Toomey

The doctrine of capacity is a mess.

From Britney Spears’s high-profile struggles to establish her own capacity to the countless, quiet challenges of so many older adults, the doctrine of capacity, which requires people to have the cognitive functioning to understand the nature and consequences of a decision in order for it to be recognized in law, is vague, normatively and medically challenging, and inconsistently applied.

This is a big deal — at stake in every capacity case is whether, on the one hand, an individual may access the legal rights most of us take for granted, to enter into contracts, buy or transfer property, or get married or divorced; or, on the other, whether the legal system will ratify a decision the “real person” never would have made.

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HLS Health Law Workshop with Leemore Dafny

HLS Health Law Workshop: Leemore Dafny

November 10, 2014 5:00 PM
Griswold Hall, Room 110 (Harvard Law School)
1525 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map here.]

Download the paper: “More Insurers Lower Premiums: Evidence from Initial Pricing in the Health Insurance Marketplaces” (co-authors, Jonathan Gruber and Christopher Ody)

Leemore Dafny is a Professor of Management and Strategy and the Herman Smith Research Professor in Hospital and Health Services at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Her research examines competitive interactions among payers and providers of healthcare services, and the intersection of industry and public policy. Dafny’s work has been published in journals such as the American Economic Review and the New England Journal of Medicine, and featured in The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Bloomberg, and The Washington Post.

Current projects include studies of consolidation in the U.S. hospital industry and the kidney dialysis industry, organizational form of provider practices, copayment coupons for prescription drugs, and the implications of for-profit ownership of insurance companies.

9/22/14: HLS Health Law Workshop with Thomas McGuire

HLS Health Law Workshop: Thomas McGuire
September 22, 2014 5:00 PM
Griswold Hall, Room 110 (Harvard Law School)
1525 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map here.]

Download the Paper: Do ‘Reverse Payment’ Settlements of Brand-Generic Patent Disputes in the Pharmaceutical Industry Constitute an Anticompetitve Pay for Delay?

Thomas G. McGuire, PhD, is a professor of health economics in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. His research focuses on the design and impact of health care payment systems, the economics of health care disparities, and the economics of mental health policy. Dr. McGuire has contributed to the theory of physician, hospital, and health plan payment. His research on health care disparities includes developing approaches to defining and measuring disparities, and study of the theory and measurement of provider discrimination. For more than 30 years, Dr. McGuire has conducted academic and policy research on the economics of mental health.