DCIS Study Amplifies Questions and Demand for Answers

By Dalia Deak

This week, a JAMA Oncology article made a splash when it intensified discussion around what ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) should be considered – cancer, precursor, or risk factor – and whether current treatment approaches have been effective. The New York Times, The Guardian, and others have picked up the story, and readers have reacted extensively, only amplifying a demand for answers to questions raised.

Often called Stage 0 breast cancer, DCIS is considered to be abnormal cells that are confined inside the milk ducts and, as such, are not considered invasive. Because of the increased risk associated with DCIS, many women who are found to have DCIS (a growing number considering the frequency of and improvements in mammography) undergo lumpectomies or mastectomies often accompanied by radiation therapy. Read More

THIS WEEK (3/18 – 3/20): Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

child_pediatrician_slide_270_200_85_c1March 18 – 20, 2015

Harvard Medical School
Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Boston, MA 02115

A full agenda is available on our website.

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter.

This multidisciplinary program has been developed to inform and deliberate with ethicists, health care providers, attorneys and the public about changes in conceptions of the family and medical technologies and practices that challenge moral conventions and contemporary law.  Faculty experts and participants will engage in thoughtful discussion regarding a broad range of ethical and legal issues that arise from new ways of creating and new ways of understanding families and providing health care for expectant parents, growing fetuses, infants, children, adolescents….and their families.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

Tomorrow: A Conversation with Jim Doyle

A Conversation with Jim Doyle
October 15, 2014 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Room 1019, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

JimDoyleJoin the Harvard Health Law Society for a lunch talk with former Attorney General and Governor of Wisconsin Jim Doyle. Come hear about the former governor’s experiences tackling public health issues through state politics and join us for a Q&A session about health policy, health law careers, and politics. Governor Jim Doyle served as the 44th governor of Wisconsin and is recognized as a national leader in health care, energy, biotechnology, and many other areas. He has worked closely with the White House, high-ranking officials, and other governors. He currently serves as counsel for Foley & Lardner and is teaching a class at the Harvard School of Public Health this fall entitled “Health Policy, Leadership, and Politics at the State.”

Co-sponsored by the Center for Health Law Policy and Innovation and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics.

Petrie-Flom Intern’s Weekly Round-Up, 3/28-4/4

By Chloe Reichel

In an attempt to increase transparency and accountability of Medicare, the Obama administration will release data about the services provided as a part of this program. The information will focus on the number and kind of services provided.

In the six months following the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, over seven million Americans signed up for insurance plans. These figures are in accordance with those estimated by congressional budget analysts.

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries has appealed a case to the Supreme Court about a generic form of its drug Copaxone. Teva is trying to keep their patent on the drug to prevent the manufacture of generics.

Judge David C. Bury, a federal judge in Tucson, will not stop the implementation of rules that restrict the usage of the abortion drug mifepristone in the state of Arizona. The legislation that restricted the usage of this drug went into effect on Tuesday.

On Monday, the last day for sign ups for health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act, hundreds of thousands attempted to register for policies. The website HealthCare.gov had some glitches on this day, including a period of a few hours in which the site failed to accept applications.

The Affordable Care Act has allowed many Americans who were previously uninsured to sign up for health insurance, leading to increased usage of health services. This is creating new stresses for small health clinics, but also providing additional funds that allow these clinics to operate.

On Thursday the FDA approved a handheld antidote for painkiller overdoses. The naloxone device, made by kaleo Inc., is called Evzio.

An ethics report was recently released on the risks of long-term space travel. The report addresses physical and psychological risks associated with space travel.